Booting


There are times when I wish I could get a new computer, but I worry what I’d do with all that lost time. Now, I sit and I wait. I tap at my phone, which sometimes feels just as slow. There is a whine and and grind, and a flicker inside behind all the plastic tells me that something is eventually going to happen.

This is the moment, or series of moments, full of anticipation and disappointment for me. To you it may be unrecognisable, but too me it’s  the part of my day which belittles all my finest efforts to become a better and more productive individual. It is when my computer starts up.

To counter these intense frustration I took to tappitying on my phone, but that in its own right brings a similar level of frustration. Of late I’ve found a way to make the time pass more enjoyably, to the point that I don’t even notice when my computer has finished booting.

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When we were in primary school the odd time we’d get a teacher in the to keep and eye on us for half an hour or an hour so that we wouldn’t run riot and defile the entire classroom, as experience had taught our teachers wisely. Once in a while a teacher, clearly stumped with how to entertain a completely different group of scoundrels not of her own understanding, would distribute blank sheets of paper, pencils, and crayons with the instruction that we should ‘take the pencil for a walk’ then colour in the spaces. If there’s one thing I love to mess around with it’s colour, and when I was younger this was no different.

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Anyway, now I’m older messing around with colour is a less than frequent activity, but thanks to my dingy computer my line walk taking has experienced a rebirth. Unfortunately I’ve only got five colours, not including the usual black and red pens which are adept at getting lost under all the other crap on my desk.

Regardless. Behold. My new boot time pastime is becoming me.

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What do you do during down time?

 

Korea in May


So why no blog post for a while you ask? Well I don’t know. I had something to think about then I realised…whatever…so I stopped. I could have been serious but that would have been something difficult. So I’m on the dry, blog wise. So to cheer you up here are some photographs from May in Korea, which is always a lovely month here.

 

All photographs were taken by me, Conor O’Reilly. I use a Nikon D5100 with Nikkor DX 35mm f/1.8 lens, and I edit in Lightroom only. Pictures were taken in Suwon, Jumunjin, Pyeongchang, Seoul, and Hwaseong. Remember to check my Flickr for more regular uploads, and I’m also on Instagram.

Of course, you’ll recall my post from Buddha’s Birthday, and Monochrome Seoul which have more pictures from this past month.

 

Yangyang Traditional Market


Across Korea traditional markets are still a common feature. Taking place every five days in towns and even cities, the markets give a brief insight into an older part of Korea. For the most part these markets are straightforward occasions and possibly a bit like you could imagine in the so-called olden days, drawing in all the local populace for not only business but also social reasons.

Throughout you can see people meeting and doing business, while at the same time there is a good quantity of back slapping and hearty laughing by the stalls. There are rows and rows of people, mostly old women it has to be said, selling what is clearly the excess from their small gardens, and for them it seems to be as much a chance to get out and meet people, with the added benefit of actually making some money.

This is a K-Pop free zone. Not because of the age, but because of the distance it sits from the modern and vibrant image which K-Pop and Hallyu parades as Korean. There are no hanboks, palaces, models with plastic surgery, dramatic light shows, or indeed very many young people at all. Korea will be more like this, the majority of the population being between 30 and 50 years old, and this relatively young country will soon be an old one holding on to its past as much as its future pushes to break free.

These markets are not only rural occasions, as they function within every city, the most famous being Moran Market. Travel past the glitz of any main street and burried in its alleys and side streets this side of Korea persists, struggling against the tide fueled by a minority keen to present a new Korea to the world.

Talk will persist eternally about how to combine these two elements but one is always going to be a loser. I’m not trying to sound critical here, just to explain a reality which isn’t spoken of much. Too many distractions seem to occupy the imaginations of everyone invested in Korea with a voice, but still Korea carries on, some struggling, a few thriving, many taking what they can from the ride and hoping for the best in the end. It’s no denying what demographic the people thriving usually make up, and if you need it hint, it is rarely the vendors and patrons of places like Yangyang market.

Below is a selection of an extended set of photographs now available to view on flickr. Please click this link to see more!

November in Yeongtong


Just as I had my camera on the way home from work last week, I had it again yesterday as I walked to and from work. This time it was nice and bright out and ideal for catching the last of the autumn leaves.

In Korea you’ll never hear the end of the talk about the colours of the trees. And I won’t lie, often I forget how splendid it is. Now last year I may have been preoccupied with +1’s impending arrival, but I think this year Yeongtong is looking especially fine. The weather has been splendid, without the usual rain and occasional gale, so perhaps this is why we are being treated to this fine frieze of leaves.

Of course just as I all but finish this post it starts to rain.

I won’t bore you any further with my interpretations of this loveliness, and just get down to the photos. I haven’t tampered with them, except for the odd crop. I use a Nikon D5100 with a 35mm 1:1.8f DX lens (if you want to buy me a new fancy lens you’re more than welcome – its my birthday soon if you need an excuse).

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All photography copyright Conor O’Reilly 2013. If you’d to use any of these images please contact me

In Dublin


Today was the twentieth day of August, 2013. On this day, myself and Herself went to Dublin. Here are some of the things we saw.

Words will follow shortly.

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I use a Nikon D5100 to take these photos, with either an 18-55mm or 35mm lens attached. Photos will be uploaded in more detail to my flickr page, but for now please enjoy them here.

All photographs copyright of Conor O’Reilly 2013. Reproduction without permission is forbidden.