Snowmadgedon…ish…n’t.


We were all warned about it (weren’t we?) so we all prepared appropriately. I made sure to put the car in the basement of our apartment complex and dusted down my big ould boots that I reserve for weather like this. Most importantly, I made sure that my phone had a full battery because I knew that this day was going to be a busy day, snowmagedon was on its way.

Last Wednesday Korea got its first real good dose of snow, and by Korea I mean the entire penninsula and not just the east coast and mountains. From around mid-day until six o’clock it snowed pretty heavily, and by the time it had stopped snowing I hadn’t taken half as many photographs as I had hoped I would.

Maybe I’m getting old or something but the idea of stepping out into the cold with no gloves on when I could be indoors drinking warm coffee and avoiding work I should be doing just didn’t appeal to me, so I chose the latter. Granted it didn’t really snow that heavily, but it was enough to make convenience inconvenient.

It’s quite lovely outside now with all its fluffy whiteness after another light fall of snow today and yesterday, but I’m saying this from the perspective of someone who didn’t have to drive to work this morning, and if there’s one thing I like about snow it’s walking around in it.

There’s something about being in the snow, but during and after, that makes the air so much quieter, but maybe it just is quieter; there aren’t that many kids around, the traffic is slower and less hectic, and perhaps the softness brought upon by the snow muffles the noises which would regularly bounce off usually rigid surroundings. Or maybe I’m looking into it too deeply.

Here are some of the pictures I took over the past three days (excluding the inevitable Instagram ones) from around my neighbourhood and workplace here in Suwon.

The snow begins on Wednesday

The snow begins on Wednesday

After one hour of snowfall

After one hour of snowfall

I think they put this pagoda up in work purely for people to take photographs on snowy days - there was even snowed cleared from around the base.

I think they put this pagoda up in work purely for people to take photographs on snowy days – there was even snowed cleared from around the base.

Snowy lamplit trees

Snowy lamplit trees

Yesterday morning, the main street almost looked like a river.

Yesterday morning, the main street almost looked like a river.

The carpark this afternoon

The carpark this afternoon

View of the main Yeongtong drag from the 20th floor

View of the main Yeongtong drag from the 20th floor

Thought this made a nice picture - should have held my camera straight...

Thought this made a nice picture – should have held my camera straight…

Walking into work this afternoon.

Walking into work this afternoon.

Slushy Yeongtong streets

Slushy Yeongtong streets

In Bandal Park

In Bandal Park

Main gate of Kyunghee University

Main gate of Kyunghee University

All photographs taken with my iPhone 4 camera because I’m lazy 😦

For more photographs please visit my flickr page.

 

Coming Home to Snow – December 28, 2010


All over the past week we sat around watching the weather say there would be snow the next day, and of course snow never came. Even Christmas day wasn’t snowed out, as I had half hoped; it would have given me a good excuse to do nothing but sit at home in my pyjammas drinking wine, but no such luck.

We drove out to Gangneung where herself hails from, which is my favourite place in Korea. All the way through the mountains it was noticably snowless. When we got to Jumunjin, despite the wind, it was clear skies and comparably to a summer’s day. If it wasn’t for my big coat and hat, you wouldn’t have known better.

Yeongjin in Jumunjin, Gangwon-do - Dec 26, 2010

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December 2010 – A poem about Ireland


This poem was originally posted on this blog in 2010. I’m reposting it again, partly due to nostalgia and also because I believe there is something here that needs to be read.

Under a fallen fortress

returned to its use as a post office

celebrities stood and shouted,

explaining their rules of engagement:

we do not want you to do

what you are doing;

why won’t you take us to ruin

the way we want you to?

Lit by the light of flares

on ice trodden streets

children don’t play in;

sell out, bail out, get out,

among other complaints

shouted with the vigour

of beleaguered football fans.

On the other hand:

arrangements in the shape of twelve point five

should do enough to maintain some jobs

as someone has to pay for the plans

to pay for the money that everyone borrowed;

sure, how were we to know that someday

someone might want to get it back?

All our fault apparently,

the money from Brussels

A.K.A. Der Bundes Republik.

that is what the television

told me of the situation

a mere 8999 kilometres away,

with wonderful graphics flashing

in the direction of what looks like

a thirty-two county republic:

at least the Sinners will

be happy about that.

*

“There’ll be some very worried homes this Christmas”

but that’s what they say every seventh

and two weeks later it’s all down the pub

for the last of the Christmas pints now,

the last Christmas pints there now folks.

*Price not effected by the recession*

*

This is where we stand today

waiting again for someone to say

that Ireland will be alright,

just be sure to keep warm in the night.

I see young fellas are emigrating less

no one will have anyone from our mess.

At least there is an election soon

but most of us would rather gallows

where heads could be removed to a rebel tune

played by mighty tricolour draped fellows

singing songs of the decisions of an awful goon

and a dome of pleasure now a tree, rotten hollow.

The Wild Geese would hang their heads

Don’t follow them yet, we must bury our dead.

– By Conor O’Reilly
© 2010