It’s All in the Blue


Whenever I arrive in Jumunjin (home of Herself if you’re not already in the know), one of the first things I always look to do is to go down to the beach. This would make sense to most people as a goal when you arrive in a coastal town, right? But I like to think I’m different because I do it regardless of the weather.

Not only is there some good coffee shops to hide from the elements, but once you walk down the street you can first smell the strong sea air and then you hear its rumble. The waves here aren’t dramatic by any stretch of the imagination, but they make enough noise for you to hear them as you a approach. When the street rises to meet the low sea wall the blue horizon starts to stretch, and then there it is, blue everywhere. It’s worth it every time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Days of Chuseok


The Chuseok holiday is ending slowly here. All that is left is the rest of the weekend, but that’s not really Chuseok. Most businesses will open up tomorrow in the hope of catching those desperate to restock their fridge and fill their belly with something other than Chuseok food.

Of course we suffer in Korea this year because Chuseok, a three day holiday, has fallen on a Thursday, so the three days around it also meld into Saturday and Sunday making it a nice rounded five day break. There will be a very slow and more unenthusiastic than usual start to work all around the country this Monday.

Myself, Herself, and +1 have been on the east coast since Tuesday. The town, as you may already know, is called Jumunjn (주문진) and it’s where Herself was born and grew up. Her parent’s house is a short walk from the beach, and to a certain extent it is within very short distance of some fairly nice countryside. If you’re fortunate enough to have a car then there’s a wealth of scenery and country well worth exploring.

As it’s kind of late at night and +1 seems to be more restless in the evenings (she’s just under 10 months old now) I’m going to share with you some photographs I’ve take over the past few days, rather than writing a long essay. Some are s little blurry as I’m still struggling with having the right amount of paetience to make this DSLR of mine work for me. Still, I hope you enjoy them.

If you’d like to read a little more about my experience celebrating Chuseok in my own home in Suwon, please follow the link.

Also be sure to check out Ben Haynes guest post Get Ready, Get Set…Chuseok

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Copyright all photographs Conor O’Reilly, September 2013. All rights reserved.

Walking Around Jumunjin – June 15, 2012


Kindergarten closeup.A wallCylindersThe back of a buildingHalf and halfShutter down
Another closed door.Minimalist gardening.Sneak a peek.Big and smallGreen doorsGrowing through the concrete.
Old fashioned window box.This is not a flower shop.Roses fenced in.Almost symetricalYeongjin sea wall.An alley - note the old style houses.
The East SeaShowersWallIrishEvacuation routeRestaurant

By no stretch of the imagination do I consider myself a photographer, but I do like taking pictures, and I do like sharing them with others. Before I wrote my last post on Jumunjin, I spent an hour or two walking around a small area close to Herself’s folks’ place. As usual, I took my camera with me. Continue reading

The A – Z of Korea


A is for anjou … anjou, oh anjou, I don’t really want to eat you because I’ve just had dinner and the idea of having to eat more really doesn’t make me want to stay drinking here. To add insult to injury, eating is cheating.

B is for booze … booze, yes booze. Korea is infamous for its alcohol consumption rate. Korea has one of the highest alcohol consumption rates in the OECD. You won’t here too many over in KNTO towers (or whatever the Korean tourism crowd is called now) sharing such interesting facts with you. What’s interesting about drink culture here is, even though there is so much alcohol consumed, drinking has so many social rules, it’s a wonder that anyone bothers with it at all.

C is for Corea … Korea gets its name from the Goryeo Dynasty apparently. The use of Korea or Corea is a relatively modern phenomenon though and is linked to the colonial period. However, before the Japanese ruled Korea, Korea was commonly referred to as Chosun after the dynastic rule at the time. Corea and Korea were used regularly before the turn of the twentieth century, but the ‘K’ apparently became standardised the more around the time that Japanese rule was enforced. The theory behind is so that Korea would appear behind Japan in international ordering. To some this might sound bizzare, but this is Asia folks and stuff like that matters, especially when you are supposed to be ruling them. However, the evidence to support an official Japanese dictate enforcing this is merely circumstantial for now. You’ll come across Corea quite a bit at international football games, and often you will hear some school students repeating what their primary school teacher has been preaching. You can read a good article about the Corea/Korea history here.

Continue reading

Making do…


Woe of woes!

I was in town on Sunday and on the way into Itaewon from Jongno, my camera dissappeared! It wasn’t stolen, I don’t even remember when I had it last, but I know for definite when I didn’t have it!

To say that this is a shite buzz is an understatement.

Not only do I have no camera, I now have to buy a new one. And yes, I do HAVE TO buy a new one.

Fortunately there weren’t that many pictures saved on it but most of what I had planned for the next year in terms of taking pictures has now gone out the window until I can somehow land myself 1,000,000 won to buy a new camera. And yes, I do HAVE TO pay at least that much; it’s what I paid for the previous one four years ago.

Continue reading