The Top 9 Reasons not to Write a Top 10


Maybe you already know this…

(In no particular order of preference)

  • How much do you really know about something?
    In fairness, as much as an expert you may be, you hardly know everything about one thing. In fact anyone who claims to do this doesn’t really suit my take on anything. But even if you do suggest that you do know everything about anything, do yourself a favour, exclude the word ‘definitive’ and any of its synonyms.
  • Continue reading

Why do we Hate Christmas Songs?


It wouldn’t be an overstatement to suggest that many people despise Christmas songs. There’s something about them that gets people’s spines shivering. Their over jovial and upbeat tunes chiming away in the background while we’re struggling over dilemmas, such as whether or not we should get Uncle Billy or Jimmy the pink scarf, seem to encourage our inner Scrooge to fester.

It’s not that Christmas songs are bad, it is more like we are just sick and tired of them. It’s like listening to a whole back catalogue of reasonable enough number 1’s all at the same time, but more than this it’s the catchy poppy over enthusiasm of number 1’s singing about the same thing – Christmas. Oh, and the fact that you have to go through this every year at the same time is another reason to not look forward to having to hear Christmas songs over and over and over again. Did I mention that most Christmas songs never even reached number 1 status?

Continue reading

Letter from Korea, October 2011


Suwon, South Korea
20/10/2011

Dear Ireland

There are probably two moments in my life which I regard as life defining. Of all the moments which made a difference, the two most important really changed who I was and where I was going in my life. If I could be astute I could claim that they gave me a greater sense of purpose, allowing me to understand who I am more. One of these moments was coming to Korea. The other was the first time I heard The Stone Roses play. Continue reading

Seoul Ceili: Irish Dance and Music Festival 2011


So, some harmless self promotion here on my behalf!

If you have any questions please leave a comment for me and I’ll reply asap.

For the second year in a row the Irish Association of Korea’s will host a céilí in Seoul. This September’s event will take place on September 25th in the new D Cube Center at Sindorim Station (Line 1 & 2). The event will be both a showcase for traditional Irish dance and music and for a chance for the general public to try out some Irish dancing.

A céilí is a large group dance that originated in Ireland. The name céilí originates from the Irish word le chéile, which means together. It is this togetherness which typifies every céilí dance. Dancers form into pairs or groups of four and dance together with other groups. The music itself is usually not fast and participants can enjoy a relaxed, friendly and sociable occasion awaiting them.

A fun family day out is promised. The dancing is suitable for all ages and all levels of enthusiasm. The steps are easy and don’t require any level of expertise to learn, and even if you are worried about missing a ‘2’ in your ‘1,2,3’ step, don’t worry as there will be plenty of volunteers on hand to help and guide you through.

There is no need to feel intimidated if you are expecting something similar to the famous Broadway extravaganza, Riverdance. While there will be some demonstrations of Irish dancing with more than its fair share of high kicks and athletic skipping, céilí dancing is a much simpler variant of Irish dance.

This September’s céilí promises to be a special event and will include two groups playing traditional Irish music. One group, Bard, is comprised of Korean musicians and have had considerable success playing in competitions in Ireland. The second group, Banú, is made up of musicians from Ireland, Korea, the United States, and Canada. As well as this, there will be displays by two Korean Irish dance troupes.

The music and dancing will start at 1pm and will continue until 5pm. To get to this event take the subway to Sindorim Station (line 1 & 2) and leave by exit 1 or 2. The event will be held in the large theatre space in front of the D Cube Center. Please follow the signs from exits of the subway station, and if in doubt listen out for the music.

 

This event is kindly supported by The Irish Embassy and Daesung Corporation.

The Irish Association of Korea is a registered not-for-profit organisation in Korea – www.iak.co.kr

HBC Fest – Rock n’ Roll (and some folk) Photos


Here are some more pics from May’s HBC Fest, this time I’m keeping all things musical this time and focusing purely on the live acts. I have a few more pictures of the crowd’s antics to post but I’m going to give the people who make the Fest worth going to some credit – in fairness it wouldn’t be much of a music festival without much music, right?

These photos are going to start from the beginning, around 1 or 2 in the afternoon. I didn’t get to see everyone, but everyone I did see did get a photo included. I decided to go with a slideshow this time.

Enjoy!

 

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By-the-by, let me know what you think of how this was presented – did the slideshow work? I have other options for displaying photos that I’m currently exploring. I want to avoid the big long post of photos I’ve been doing in the past.

If you’d like me to send you some photos, please contact me.